In Conversation

‘Rebooting’: An Eco-Pedagogy

Posted by on Oct 30, 2014 in News and Events | Comments Off on ‘Rebooting’: An Eco-Pedagogy

‘Rebooting’: An Eco-Pedagogy

Stephen Muecke, Environmental Humanities, University of New South Wales As an experiment in eco-pedagogy and environmental humanities, students were asked to ‘reinstitute’ their disciplines with a different kind of temporality. The modernist progression of their discipline was abandoned as they faced a more uncertain, possibly catastrophic future. So a time machine was built and ‘Diplomats’ were brought back from 2035 to assess their attempts to reboot their disciplines. In a recent course I experimented with a...

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Trying to assemble an “Anthropocene Curriculum”

Posted by on Mar 16, 2014 in News and Events | 2 comments

Trying to assemble an “Anthropocene Curriculum”

by Christoph Rosol, Mar 15, 2014 This event is to be held November 14-22, 2014 Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin The Anthropocene—or however you choose to name the current era of environmental transition on a planetary scale—is a more-than-real challenge for human civilization. A crucial aspect of this challenge is to ferret out and create new forms of collectives. First of all, there is a need for a wide array of habitual collectives to bring the technically empowered, and maybe out-of-control human agency into closer awareness...

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Editorial Profile: Kate Rigby

Posted by on Jan 18, 2014 in Editorial Profiles | 0 comments

Editorial Profile: Kate Rigby

Kate Rigby is Professor of Environmental Humanities at Monash University, Australia. Her most recent books are Topographies of the sacred: The poetics of place in European Romanticism (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2004) and Ecocritical Theory: New European Perspectives (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2011 – edited with A. Goodbody). Editors: We asked members of our Editorial Board/Team to provide a short reflection on a photograph of their choice that they felt says something important about or to...

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Provoked Discussion: “On the Poverty of Our Nomenclature”

Posted by on Nov 3, 2013 in Provocations | 1 comment

Provoked Discussion: “On the Poverty of Our Nomenclature”

Eileen Crist Department of Science and Technology in Society at Virginia Tech, USA This provocation was published in Volume 3, 2013. Abstract This paper examines the recent proposal to christen our geological epoch “the Anthropocene.” The reasoning offered for this new name is that humanity’s enormous mark on the geological strata would be a discernible boundary to future geologists; therefore a change in nomenclature is called for to reflect our transition out of the Holocene (our epoch’s current formal name). I argue, however, that...

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Open Access and the Environmental Humanities

Posted by on Oct 23, 2013 in Miscellaneous | 10 comments

Open Access and the Environmental Humanities

To mark Open Access Week (21-27 Oct 2013) we decided to get a conversation started about OA and the environmental humanities. We asked the following question of a few people who know a lot about this topic: Does open access publishing have a particularly important role to play when it comes to research in the environmental humanities? Why? Below are some of the responses we received. Please join the conversation with the “comments” function below or email the editors with longer replies to add to this...

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Editorial Profile: Catriona Sandilands

Posted by on Oct 1, 2013 in Editorial Profiles | 0 comments

Editorial Profile: Catriona Sandilands

Catriona Sandilands is Canada Research Chair in Sustainability and Culture at York University. Her work lies at the intersections of queer and feminist theory, environmental philosophy and political theory, and cultural studies. She is the author of The Good-Natured Feminist: Ecofeminism and the Quest for Democracy (Minnesota, 1999) and co-editor of Queer Ecologies: Sex, Nature, Politics, Desire (Indiana University Press, 2010). Editors: We asked members of our Editorial Board/Team to provide a short reflection on a photograph of their...

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Editorial Profile: Scott Slovic

Posted by on Oct 1, 2013 in Editorial Profiles | 0 comments

Editorial Profile: Scott Slovic

Scott Slovic served as founding president of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) from 1992 to 1995 and has edited the journal ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment since 1995. The author of many books and articles in the field, he is currently writing Fundamentals of Ecocriticism and Environmental Literature and editing The Cambridge Companion to American Literature and Environment, among other projects. He is professor of literature and environment at the University of Idaho,...

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Provoked discussion: “A NeoPresocratic Manifesto”

Posted by on Sep 30, 2013 in Provocations | 0 comments

Provoked discussion: “A NeoPresocratic Manifesto”

J. Baird Callicott Department of Philosophy and Religion Studies, University of North Texas, USA This provocation was published in Volume 2, 2013. Abstract Ancient Greek philosophy begins with natural philosophy (the Milesians, Heraclitus, Empedocles, Anaxagoras), followed after about a century by a focus on moral philosophy (Socrates and the sophists). The pattern is repeated in the Modern period: first natural philosophy re-emerged after the Dark and Middle Ages (Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, Newton) followed by...

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Take Back the Economy – an interview with Katherine Gibson

Posted by on Sep 18, 2013 in Videos | 1 comment

Take Back the Economy – an interview with Katherine Gibson

To mark the launch of Katherine Gibson’s new collaborative book, Deborah Rose sat down with her to talk about taking back the economy. This interview was conducted in September 2013 in Sydney, Australia. Take Back the Economy: An Ethical Guide for Transforming Our Communities was written by J.K. Gibson-Graham, Jenny Cameron, and Stephen Healy and published by the University of Minnesota Press. Take Back the Economy dismantles the idea that the economy is separate from us and best comprehended by experts, demonstrating that the economy...

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Editorial Profiles – Series Three

Posted by on Jul 1, 2013 in Editorial Profiles | 0 comments

Editorial Profiles – Series Three

In this series of profiles we asked members of our Editorial Board/Team to provide a short reflection on a photograph of their choice that they felt says something important about or to the environmental humanities. James Hatley Mark Pedelty Jamie Lorimer Thom van...

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