Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities

A

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Aion: James Hatley (Volume 6, 2015)


B

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Becoming-With: Kate Wright (Volume 5, 2014)

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Belonging: Emily O’Gorman (Volume 5, 2014)

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Broken: Cameron Muir (Volume 5, 2014)


C

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Care: Thom van Dooren (Volume 5, 2014)

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Climate: Mike Hulme (Volume 6, 2015)


D


E

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Encounter: Maan Barua (Volume 7, 2015)

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Endangered: Simon Pooley (Volume 7, 2015)


F


G


H

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Hope: Eben Kirksey (Volume 5, 2014)


I

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Infection: Celia Lowe (Volume 5, 2014)


J


K


L

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Labour: Jennifer Hamilton (Volume 6, 2015)


M

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Memory: Tom Bristow (Volume 5, 2014)


N


O


P


Q


R


S

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Sacrifice: Hugo Reinert (Volume 7, 2015)


T


U


V


W


X


Y


Z



Editors: Emily O’Gorman and Kate Wright

The Environmental Humanities inhabit a difficult space of simultaneous critique and action. Scholarship in this field is grounded in an important tension between, on the one hand, the common critical focus of the humanities in ‘unsettling’ dominant narratives, and on the other, the dire need for thoughtful and constructive practice in these dark times.

The Living Lexicon for the Environmental Humanities is a series of 1,000 word essays that respond to this challenge. Each essay highlights the importance of a particular keyword, demonstrating how it might help the Environmental Humanities to move in interesting directions that take seriously this dual imperative for critique and action. The pieces are both scholarly and creative, and include personal reflections by authors and experimental musings based on their own research. The Lexicon aims for concise, provocative prose, rather than dictionary-style entries. Lexicon entries are peer-reviewed using a standard double-blind process.

Each essay will be published in a special section of the journal Environmental Humanities and will also be included on this dedicated page within the journal’s website.

For further information, or if you are interested in contributing to the Lexicon, please see the journal’s website or email the Lexicon editors.